Spectroscopy / Spectrograph - Star Analyser SA-100, anyone using this?

PGM scripting language, search and discovery of comets, asteroids and supernova.
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rottielover
Posts: 128
Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2018 8:22 pm
Location: Missouri, USA
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Mon Jun 24, 2019 4:58 pm

A friend of mine in the local astronomy club posted a message about RSpec and the SA-100, SA-200 "filter" Grating. He was telling me that this could be something that can be done while waiting for astronomical dark before the start of an imaging session. Now that I have my 3 camera's working with Prism I could in theory use my DLSR that's piggybacked in order to perform some spectroscopy before or maybe even during an imaging session.

Is anyone out there using Prism with the SA-100 or 200 ? Are you getting good results? Would you recommend this product? If not what would you recommend for a "citizen" who's not a part of any professional observatory but would be interested in donating data?

Thank you in advance for your response!
daniel_nicholas
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2018 12:43 pm

Tue Jun 25, 2019 1:31 pm

Hi,
Please apologies for my spelling mistakes. I’m not a native english speacker.

Definiteley you can achieve good results with Star Analyzer and Prism software! You can select a star and contol the telescope in integrated Prism planetarium, you can put the target star in the center of the frame using platesolve function and all you need is to expose the target star so isn’t saturated. Take 10-20 frames, calibrate and stack them for increasing the SNR and look into the spectral profile to find what’s there (Prism, RSpec, BASS or Visual Spec have powerfull reduction tools for this purpose).
I encourage you to enter in spectroscopy field because is very rewarding, it is related to many astrophysical and cosmological aspects in modern astronomy and you will learn a lot. Maybe you will not be able to make great discoveries because the Star Analyzer is a low resolution spectrograph but without doubt you will can:
- classify the stars upon their spectral profile and estimate their temperature, presence/absence of some dust or gas rings close to the star (Be shell and Wolf Rayet stars), find presence of various chemical elements (hydrogen, helium, carbon, nitrogen, calcium, magnesium, sodium, titan oxide, iron) in the stars photosphere and view the ionised gases in the nebula. With a big SCT telescope I think you can estimate the redshift of close quasaras (3C273) and see how the novae or supernovae explosion evolve during months.
I don’t have a big scope. I have 2 newtonian telescopes (SW 130 and SW 200mm/F5) and last autumn I make some observations on Wolf-Rayet, Simbyotic and Carbon stars using Star Analyzer, Prism and RSpec. Here I put some results. These are small results, entry level spectrum profiles but as a science teacher in high school I can make wonderful astronomy projects with my students and they are excited and motivated to find particular lines in various star spectrum profiles and to think about physical and chemical properties that generated them.
Remember that in astronomy the big is better. Begin with small and inexpensive Star Analyzer and for years you will open the sky for you and your friends. Next, after years, if the spectroscopy remain in your interest and you learn about stars and aquire good skills, invest the moneys in a better solution as Aply600, Dados or Lhires.

Good luck and clear skies!
Daniel
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rottielover
Posts: 128
Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2018 8:22 pm
Location: Missouri, USA
Contact:

Tue Jun 25, 2019 6:22 pm

Daniel,

Those are amazing, sounds like you have some very engaged and enthusiastic students!

I have a lot of information to digest yet on this topic. Am I correct in assuming that Prism will work for the capturing of the data, but I will need something like RSpec in order to analyse the data?
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