TYC5061-513-1 occultation by Asteroid 38628 Huya

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daniel_nicholas
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2018 12:43 pm

Thu Mar 28, 2019 3:18 pm

Hi Hamza,
On 18 March, I observed and recorded an occultation of star TYC506-513-1 from Ophiucus by the trans-neptunian object 38628 Huya. The occultation began at 00:53:33, it was end at 00:54:25 (UTC time) and last for 52 seconds. I made the observations from Romania (Europe) and I used the Prism for controlling and pointing the telescope. Without Prism it would have been difficult to find and center the star in the ccd frame. Amazing and very powerfull piece of software!
Here is the results: a short mp4 movie (play at 1080Hd for better view) with the occultation and the light curve of the occulted star. I make photometry in Tangra and acquisition in SharpCap because it has better download time (I run for continuous 45 minutes of 0.2 sec expousure/frame, bin 2x2 with QHY 163 cmos).
https://drive.google.com/open?id=1zM2cP ... HYDSCUgcTa
Best regards,
Daniel Bertesteanu
Bucharest Astronomy Association
Romania
Hamza Touhami
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Posts: 564
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Location: Phoenix,AZ
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Thu Mar 28, 2019 10:15 pm

This absolutely amazing Daniel, I am so honored. We need to discuss potentially writing a tutorial for the rest of our customers. this is incredible and thank you for sharing with us
Hamza Touhami | Site Administrator
Hyperion-Astronomy.com
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Alnitak
Posts: 55
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:19 am
Location: Las Vegas, NV
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Sat Mar 28, 2020 8:28 pm

That is amazing! I'm curious why we are unable to see the asteroid that is doing the occulting? I would think it would be quite large to occult the star for such a long period of time and would, therefore, be visible, even if much fainter.
E.S. 127mm ED, SV70T, Celestron CGX, ZWO ASI1600mm w/ Baader LRGB Ha OIII SII filters, Orion 50mm guide scope with S.S.A.G.

“The brain is like a muscle. When it is in use we feel very good. Understanding is joyous.” - Carl Sagan
daniel_nicholas
Posts: 7
Joined: Sat Mar 24, 2018 12:43 pm

Wed Apr 01, 2020 5:11 pm

Hi Alnitak,
I was unable to see this far object because last year I used a 8" reflector, ridiculously small for that kind of TNO object.
(38628) Huya is around 400-500 km diameter and has a apparent magnitude around 19. To see it, we must have larger scopes, exposures longer than 0.2 sec and very good sky conditions.
Here there is a plot with Huya orbit around Sun and a list with orbital and physical parameters. At the second link the same thing and the list of all observers who reported the Huya in the last years with magnitude. We see that the reports are from profesional observatories/surveys like ATLAS, Palomar-ZTF, Pan-STARRS or NBO. To see Huya you could acces their online databases and maybe you will find it.
https://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr= ... 0#phys_par
https://minorplanetcenter.net/db_search ... t_id=38628

Clear sky!
Daniel
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Alnitak
Posts: 55
Joined: Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:19 am
Location: Las Vegas, NV
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Sun Apr 05, 2020 11:20 am

daniel_nicholas wrote:
Wed Apr 01, 2020 5:11 pm
Hi Alnitak,
I was unable to see this far object because last year I used a 8" reflector, ridiculously small for that kind of TNO object.
(38628) Huya is around 400-500 km diameter and has a apparent magnitude around 19. To see it, we must have larger scopes, exposures longer than 0.2 sec and very good sky conditions.
Here there is a plot with Huya orbit around Sun and a list with orbital and physical parameters. At the second link the same thing and the list of all observers who reported the Huya in the last years with magnitude. We see that the reports are from profesional observatories/surveys like ATLAS, Palomar-ZTF, Pan-STARRS or NBO. To see Huya you could acces their online databases and maybe you will find it.
https://ssd.jpl.nasa.gov/sbdb.cgi?sstr= ... 0#phys_par
https://minorplanetcenter.net/db_search ... t_id=38628

Clear sky!
Daniel
Thanks Daniel.
I did not realize the occulting object was so faint. Yeah, It's obvious now why the mag. 19 object is not visible in such short exposures.
Thanks for the info, I've never attempted any asteroid occultations. Maybe something in my future.
E.S. 127mm ED, SV70T, Celestron CGX, ZWO ASI1600mm w/ Baader LRGB Ha OIII SII filters, Orion 50mm guide scope with S.S.A.G.

“The brain is like a muscle. When it is in use we feel very good. Understanding is joyous.” - Carl Sagan
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